Check Out Kindle Books at the Library

See How Easily You Can Check Out a Kindle Book From Your Local Library

 

If you’ve been paying attention to the U.S. news media you may have noticed that it’s now possible to check out Amazon Kindle books from your local public library. That’s right; as long as you have a valid library card and an Amazon account, you can visit some 11,000 library sites and download Amazon Kindle books to your Kindle or Kindle app-enabled device via WiFi or USB. You can read the book on any generation Kindle device or free Kindle reading app.

Similar to regular books, libraries have a limited number of Kindle copies for each title so you will have to check availability. To see whether Kindle check-outs are available at a library near you, call your local librarian. Another similarity to physical books is that Kindle copies will have an expiration date — but after that date, they can either be renewed or purchased through Amazon, with all of your bookmarks and notations still intact. Kindle books feature real page numbers and Whispersync technology that synchronizes your notes, highlights, and last page read. For questions about availability of Kindle library books, loan duration, and terms of use, you should contact your local library.

How It Works

You can easily borrow Kindle books through your local library’s website and, with the click of a button, have them delivered to your Kindle device or free reading app.

• Visit the website of a United States library that offers digital services from OverDrive.

• Check out a Kindle book using your valid library card.

• Click on “Get for Kindle” and then sign in to your Amazon.com account to have the book delivered instantly to your Kindle device or reading app.

 

Public library books can be sent wirelessly to Kindle devices via an active Wi-Fi connection or transferred via USB. The service also has some other interesting features:

• Page numbers correspond to those in print editions.

• Facebook and Twitter integration lets you share favorite passages.

• Popular Highlights show Kindle owners’ comments on passages in books.

• Public Notes shares people’s opinions on books.

One last benefit that checking Kindle books out offers over physical books may not be so obvious. In a statement, Amazon’s Kindle director, Jay Marine said, “Normally, making margin notes in library books is a big no-no. But we’re fixing this by extending our Whispersync technology to library books, so your notes, highlights and bookmarks are always backed up and available the next time you check out the book or if you decide to buy the book.”

 

 

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